Author Archives: UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences

Meet Dr. Andrew Rypel, our new fish squeezer

This year, we have the pleasure of welcoming Dr. Andrew Rypel to UC Davis and the Center for Watershed Sciences to his appointment as the new Peter B. Moyle and California Trout Endowed Chair in Coldwater Fishes. Dr. Rypel shares some of this thoughts about fish, science, … Continue reading

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Accounting for groundwater movement between subbasins under SGMA

by Christina Buck, Jim Blanke, Reza Namvar, and Thomas Harter The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) presents many new challenges and opportunities.  One challenge is accounting for ‘interbasin flow,’ or subsurface groundwater movement between subbasins, a piece of the overall … Continue reading

Posted in California Water, Groundwater, Planning and Management, Sustainability | Tagged | 3 Comments

20 Years Ago a Pretty Good Idea: The UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences

by Jeffrey Mount The UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences turns 20 years old this month.  I am the first Director of the Center.  The current Director — Jay Lund — asked me to write an  account of the origins … Continue reading

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Evolutionary genomics informs salmon conservation

by Tasha Thompson, Michael Miller, Daniel Prince and Sean O’Rourke Spring Chinook and summer steelhead (premature migrators) have been extirpated or are in decline across most of their range while fall Chinook and winter steelhead populations (mature migrators) remain relatively healthy. … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Fish | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Groundwater Nitrate Sources and Contamination in the Central Valley

by Katherine Ransom and Thomas Harter In California’s Central Valley, many communities depend significantly or entirely on groundwater as their drinking water supply. Studies estimate the number of private wells in the Central Valley to be on the order of … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture, California Water, Groundwater, Nitrate, Water Supply and Wastewater | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Floodplains in California’s Future

by Peter Moyle, Jeff Opperman, Amber Manfree, Eric Larson, and Joan Florshiem The flooding in Houston is a reminder of the great damages that floods can cause when the defenses of an urban area are overwhelmed.  It is hard to … Continue reading

Posted in Around the World, Climate Change, flood, Floodplains, reconciliation | Tagged , | 3 Comments

The Little Shasta River: A model for sustaining our national heritage

by Ann Willis, Rob Lusardi, Alex Hart, Susan Hart, Blair Hart, Andrew Braugh, Amy Campbell, Ada Fowler Rancher: farms. Conservationist: fish. Researcher: science. Too often, identity is used to divide us. Stereotypes are used to stake out conflicting positions. It’s … Continue reading

Posted in Agriculture, Conservation, Fish, reconciliation, Restoration, Sustainability | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Preliminary Analysis of Hurricane Harvey Flooding in Harris County, Texas

by Nicholas Pinter, Nicholas Santos, and Rui Hui Located in Harris County, Texas, Houston is the 4th most populous city in the US.  The flooding now unfolding in the Houston area is a human and economic disaster likely to rank … Continue reading

Posted in Around the World, flood, Floodplains, Planning and Management, Tools | Tagged , , | 31 Comments

Trump Killed Obama’s Flood Protection Rule Two Weeks Ago

by Nicholas Pinter This post was originally published as an op-ed in Fortune. Whether or not you like President Donald Trump, the current administration has not been gifted with great timing. Just 10 days before Hurricane Harvey made landfall, the … Continue reading

Posted in Around the World, Climate Change, flood, Floodplains, Planning and Management | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

We hold our convenient truths to be self-evident – Dangerous ideas in California water

by Jay Lund Success in water management requires broad agreement and coalitions.  But people often seem to group themselves into communities of interests and ideology, which see complex water problems differently.  Each group tends to hold different truths to be … Continue reading

Posted in California Water, Planning and Management | Tagged | 8 Comments