Category Archives: Biology

Science, the Delta, and the future of San Joaquin salmon

by Peter B. Moyle I feel fortunate to be a biologist in an era and place, California, where science matters.  Routine scientific studies rarely make headlines but they are relied on by decision makers because they reduce uncertainty, bit by … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, California Water, Fish, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, San Joaquin River | Tagged | 4 Comments

Habitat Restoration for Chinook Salmon in Putah Creek: A Success Story

by Eric Chapman, Emily Jacinto, and Peter Moyle 2017 was another good year for Chinook salmon in Putah Creek. Putah Creek is just a small stream flowing through Yolo and Solano counties, fed by releases of water from Lake Berryessa. … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Fish, Restoration, Salmon | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

New paths to survival for endangered winter run Chinook salmon

by Anna Sturrock and Corey Phillis Many Californians have seen headlines about endangered Sacramento River Winter Run Chinook salmon (“winter run”) on the “brink of extinction.” But not many people know exactly what winter run are, nor why they are … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Fish, Salmon | Tagged , | 5 Comments

The Spawning Dead: Why Zombie Fish are the Anti-Apocalypse

by Mollie Ogaz   Imagine you are on the bank of a river or stream in California’s Central Valley. It is just past sunset, leaves rustle overhead, and you feel a tingling along your spine. Suddenly a zombie fish leaps … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Fish, Halloween, Salmon, Wild and Wacky | Tagged | 1 Comment

Evolutionary genomics informs salmon conservation

by Tasha Thompson, Michael Miller, Daniel Prince and Sean O’Rourke Spring Chinook and summer steelhead (premature migrators) have been extirpated or are in decline across most of their range while fall Chinook and winter steelhead populations (mature migrators) remain relatively healthy. … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Fish | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

The Future of California’s Unique Salmon and Trout: Good News, Bad News

by Robert Lusardi, Peter Moyle, Patrick Samuel, and Jacob Katz California is a hot spot for endemic species, those found nowhere else in the world.  Among these species are 20 kinds of salmon and trout. That is an astonishing number … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, California Water, Climate Change, Conservation, Fish, reconciliation, Salmon, Stressors, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 8 Comments

Facing Extinction II: Making hard decisions

by Jason Baumsteiger and Peter Moyle In part I of our blog, we projected a bleak future for many freshwater fishes, especially in California. Some difficult decisions will need to be made to prevent extinctions or to verify them.  However … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Fish, Planning and Management | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Facing extinction: California fishes

by Peter Moyle and Jason Baumsteiger At least two species of California fishes appear to be facing imminent extinction in the wild: delta smelt and winter-run Chinook salmon.  These species could join about 57 other North American fishes declared extinct. … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Fish, Planning and Management | Tagged , | 5 Comments

What lies behind the dam? In some cases, self-sustaining salmon

By K. Martin Perales Chinook salmon are a remarkably adaptable species. There is good reason to believe there are multiple populations of landlocked Chinook salmon completing their entire life cycle above Central Valley dams. We recently documented spawning above six of … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Fish, Salmon | Tagged | 4 Comments

Why care about native freshwater fish?

By Jason Baumsteiger Even with a strong El Niño year, there are no assurances the drought is over. Clearly we need a better plan for future droughts and that plan needs to include provisions for native freshwater fish.  But why … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Fish, Uncategorized | Tagged | 6 Comments