Author Archives: andrewrypel

About andrewrypel

Andrew Rypel is an Associate Professor and the Peter B. Moyle and California Trout Chair of coldwater fish ecology at the University of California, Davis. He is a faculty member in the Department of Wildlife, Fish & Conservation Biology and Co-Director of the Center for Watershed Sciences.

Which species will survive? Climate change enhances the vulnerability of California freshwater fishes to severe drought

By Peter Moyle As I write this on an October weekend, rain is falling steadily in Davis and has been for most of the day. This is the first real rain we have had in over seven months. But it … Continue reading

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Managing Water Stored for the Environment During Drought

By Sarah Null, Jeffrey Mount, Brian Gray, Michael Dettinger, Kristen Dybala, Gokce Sencan, Anna Sturrock, Barton “Buzz” Thompson, Harrison “HB” Zeff Introduction Storing water in reservoirs is important for maintaining freshwater ecosystem health and protecting native species. Stored water also … Continue reading

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Can one atmospheric river end California’s drought?

By Andrew L. Rypel and Jay Lund Given the quantity and intensity of last week’s rain, an obvious question is: ‘Is the drought over?’ Alas, the answer is a resounding no. But, the data are interesting and worth thinking about … Continue reading

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Fish eyes: the hidden diet journal

by Miranda Bell-Tilcock It is strange to think of an eye as a diet journal, but a fish’s eye can tell much about what it has been eating at each point in its life. If we know what a fish … Continue reading

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Sometimes, studying the variation is the interesting thing

By Andrew L. Rypel As scientists, we’re trained to key in on ‘response variables’. In my case, fisheries scientists often examine how fish physiology, populations, communities or whole ecosystems react to various environmental drivers or human alteration. Unfortunately, variation in … Continue reading

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Developing tools to model impaired streamflow in streams throughout California

by Jeanette Howard, Kirk Klausmeyer, Laura Read, and Julie Zimmerman Droughts are extreme, but not necessarily extreme events — at least not in the way we humans usually experience events as discrete, episodic occurrences. Droughts are continuous and exhausting; they … Continue reading

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Risk Rating 2.0: A first look at FEMA’s new flood insurance system

By Ryan Miller, Peter Hansen, and Nicholas Pinter Risk Rating 2.0 has been called the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA)’s most significant reform in 50 years.  Roughly 77% of customers of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) nationwide will see … Continue reading

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Experimental Habitats for Hatchery Delta Smelt

by Peter Moyle The Delta smelt is either extinct in the wild or close to it; in the past year only a handful have been caught, with great effort. In contrast, the UC Davis Fish Conservation and Culture Laboratory (FCCL) … Continue reading

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Do largemouth bass like droughts?

By Andrew L. Rypel “The Delta is full of species that thrive in the lakes in southern Arkansas” ~Bill Bennett by Andrew Rypel As we rapidly enter another drought, long-standing questions on ecological impacts of increased temperatures, reduced water levels … Continue reading

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Suisun Marsh fishes in 2020: Persistence during the Pandemic

by Teejay O’Rear, John Durand, Peter Moyle Suisun Marsh is central to the health of the San Francisco Estuary. Not only is it a huge (470 km2) tidal marsh in the center the northern estuary (Figure 1), but it is an … Continue reading

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