Author Archives: andrewrypel

Summer Reading in the Time of Covid 19

by Peter B. Moyle Tired of reading about the constant haggling over California water? Or of binge-watching old TV shows? Or, worse, watching the news as the Covid 19 virus spreads in our free country? For relief, I recommend two … Continue reading

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Initial Sampling of the Carp-DEUM Project

By Kim Luke, John Durand, Rachel McConnell, Aaron Sturtevant, Nina Suzuki, Andrew L. Rypel This spring, the Carp-Dependent Urgent Management (Carp-DEUM) Project began its first round of sampling in the UC Davis Arboretum before the Covid-19 lockdown. The project has … Continue reading

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What’s the dam problem with deadbeat dams?

by Andrew L. Rypel, Christine A. Parisek, Jay Lund, Ann Willis, Peter B. Moyle, Sarah Yarnell, Karrigan Börk Damming rivers was once a staple of public works and a signal of technological and scientific progress. Even today, dams underpin much … Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter

We have elected to suspend our regular CalifornaWaterBlog.com posts for this week.  Institutional racism is urgent and real, and should divert us from topics of California water at this time. The deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others … Continue reading

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Drawing boundaries with DNA to improve conservation

by Ryan Peek Foothill Yellow-legged Frogs have begun to spawn, laying small snow-globe sized egg masses in streams and rivers. They are one of the few stream-breeding frogs endemic to California and Oregon. This species is a good indicator of … Continue reading

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Protecting California’s Aquatic Biodiversity in a Time of Crisis

by Peter Moyle, Jeanette Howard, Ted Grantham “Nowhere is the biodiversity crisis more acute than in freshwater ecosystems” (Tickner et al. 2020) Weeks of being confined indoors under shelter-in-place orders increases our appreciation of the natural world. Walking and exercising … Continue reading

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Science of an underdog: the improbable comeback of spring-run Chinook salmon in the San Joaquin River

By Andrew L. Rypel, Gabriel Singer, and Nann A. Fangue “You can’t design a worse evolutionary strategy for the Anthropocene” There are many variants on this quote, and we’ve heard them often in reference to the status of native fishes … Continue reading

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Striped Bass in the Pacific Ocean: When, where and why?

by Dylan K. Stompe Striped bass are an iconic and recreationally important fish species throughout the United States, including within their native range on the Atlantic Coast. Based on their value as a sport fish and as table fare, striped … Continue reading

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Eating Delta Smelt

by Peter Moyle, Center for Watershed Sciences, UC Davis Delta smelt are an endangered species and the latest estimates of their numbers indicate they will likely not be around much longer as wild fish. When I first started working on … Continue reading

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Environmental Flows in California

By Alyssa Obester, Sarah Yarnell, and Ted Grantham The California Environmental Flow Framework was recently highlighted in the 2020 Water Resilience Portfolio to address the seemingly impossible task of establishing of how much water our rivers and streams need to … Continue reading

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