Author Archives: UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences

Trick or treat? Aliens at the door

By Chris Bowman Many of the alien species invading California’s lakes and streams would make for wickedly good Halloween costumes. Take the Shokihaze goby, Tridentiger barbatus (above and right), a native of Asian now common in Suisun Bay and the lower Sacramento … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Flagging problem dams for fish survival

By Ted Grantham and Peter Moyle This drought year, as in those past, California water regulators have given away to cities and farms some river flows critical to fish and wildlife. It’s a dicey tradeoff considering most of our native … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Modernizing drought water allocations

The State Water Resources Control Board recently solicited public comments on how to improve its drought curtailment of water rights. Here is a summary of insights and recommendations from a group of seven California water experts. By Ellen Hanak, Jeffrey Mount, Jay … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

A tribute to California’s ‘First Lady of Water’

By Tina Cannon Leahy As water policy consultant for the California Assembly, I occasionally research legislative history to iron out competing theories on a law’s meaning. So it was earlier this year when I visited the California State Archives to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 11 Comments

Drought Journal: Hope springs eternal

Is the drought hastening the decline of California’s native fish? Will they be able to recolonize once normal conditions return? To help find out, a team of researchers with the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences took the pulse of about 70 streams … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Hike Tuolumne Meadows — without breaking a sweat

  Opening scene of the Tuolumne Meadows Virtual Hike. Source: UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, Google Maps. Take the Tuolumne Meadows Virtual Hike By Sarah Yarnell To enjoy the full sweep of Yosemite’s lush and lovely Tuolumne Meadows, as shown … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Groundwater reform more important than water bond

By Jay Lund and Thomas Harter California lawmakers recently found extraordinary consensus in approving a $7.5 billion water bond for the November election ballot. If the measure wins, however, future generations will not necessarily reap many of the promised water … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 10 Comments